FECL 16 (June 1993):

MESSAGE FROM THE EDITOR: SOMETHING IS ROTTEN IN THE STATE OF DENMARK

The night following the Danish people's vote for the Maastricht Treaty, Copenhague became the scene of night-marish events likely to deeply traumatise a country known throughout the world for a deep-rooted tradition of peace and democracy.

That night, police opened fire on an angry, stone casting crowd of youthful demonstrators. The drama is unprecedented in Western Europe since World War II. Neither in Paris in 1968, nor in Brixton did police ever make use of live ammunition.

The Danish government was quick - too quick, as it might appear - in giving its full support to the police who say they acted in self-defence, and the public was so stunned by the events which would have seemed unconceivable in a Nordic country, that questions on what really happened and why, are just beginning to rise.

In agreement with our Danish reader/correspondants we have decided to await current investigations by the government and Danish NGOs before commenting the incident in the Circular Letter.

N.B.